HomeWhatWhat is Schizophrenia and its Treatments? Unraveling the Mind's Maze 2023

What is Schizophrenia and its Treatments? Unraveling the Mind’s Maze 2023

Schizophrenia is a serious and chronic mental disorder that affects how a person thinks, feels, and behaves. People with schizophrenia may experience psychosis, which means they lose touch with reality and may have hallucinations, delusions, or disorganized. Schizophrenia can interfere with daily living and cause significant disability and distress.

an illustration of a girl who is suffering from Schizophrenia.

Schizophrenia affects about 0.3% to 0.7% of people during their lifetime. It usually develops during young adulthood and affects men slightly more than women. The exact causes of schizophrenia are not fully understood, but they may involve a combination of genetic, environmental, and brain factors.

an illustration of a graph and percentage relevance of Schizophrenia prevalence.

There is no cure for schizophrenia, but it can be treated with medications and psychotherapy. Treatment can help reduce the symptoms of psychosis and improve the quality of life of people with schizophrenia and their families.

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Symptoms of Schizophrenia

The symptoms of schizophrenia vary from person to person and may change over time. They are usually classified into three categories: positive, negative, and cognitive.

Positive Symptoms

Positive symptoms are abnormal experiences that are not present in healthy people. They include:

•  Hallucinations: Seeing, hearing, feeling, smelling, or tasting things that are not there. Hearing voices is the most common type of hallucination in schizophrenia.

•  Delusions: Having false beliefs not based on reality or logic. For example, believing that someone is trying to harm you, that you have special powers, or that external forces control you.

•  Disorganized thinking: Having trouble organizing your thoughts or expressing them clearly. You may jump from one topic to another, make up words, or speak in a way others cannot understand.

•  Disorganized behavior: Having difficulty performing daily activities or behaving appropriately in social situations. You may act bizarrely or unpredictably, show inappropriate emotions, or neglect your personal hygiene.

Negative Symptoms

Negative symptoms are deficits or reductions in normal functions or emotions. They include:

•  Social withdrawal: Losing interest or motivation in social interactions or activities. You may isolate yourself from others, avoid eye contact, or speak very little.

•  Reduced emotional expression: Having a flat or blunted affect, which means showing little or no emotion on your face, voice, or gestures. You may also have difficulty expressing your feelings or understanding those of others.

•  Apathy: Having a lack of interest or enthusiasm for anything. You may have trouble setting goals, making plans, or taking initiative.

•  Anhedonia: Having a loss of pleasure or enjoyment from things that used to make you happy. You may have difficulty experiencing positive emotions such as joy, satisfaction, or love.

Cognitive Symptoms

Cognitive symptoms are problems with thinking skills such as memory, attention, and problem-solving. They include:

•  Impaired attention: Having trouble focusing on or shifting your attention from one thing to another. You may be easily distracted or forgetful.

•  Impaired memory: Having trouble remembering things that happened recently or in the past. You may also have difficulty learning new information or skills.

•  Impaired executive function: Having trouble planning, organizing, prioritizing, or making decisions. You may also have difficulty following instructions or rules.

•  Impaired social cognition: Difficulty understanding social cues, norms, or expectations. You may also have difficulty empathizing with others or taking their perspective.

Causes of Schizophrenia

The exact causes of schizophrenia are not fully understood, but they may involve a combination of genetic, environmental, and brain factors.

Genetic Factors

Schizophrenia tends to run in families, meaning having a close relative with the disorder increases your risk of developing it. However, most people with schizophrenia do not have a family history of the Researchers have identified many genes that may be involved in schizophrenia. Still, none are sufficient or necessary to cause the disorder by themselves. Instead, many genes likely interact, and environmental factors increase the risk of schizophrenia.

Environmental Factors

Environmental factors are events or conditions before birth, during childhood, or later in life that may increase the risk of schizophrenia. Some examples of environmental factors are:

•  Problems during pregnancy or birth: Infections, malnutrition, stress, exposure to toxins, complications during delivery, or brain injury may affect the development of the brain and increase the risk of schizophrenia.

•  Cannabis use during adolescence: Using cannabis (marijuana) during the teenage years may interfere with the maturation of the brain and increase the risk of psychosis and schizophrenia.

•  Childhood adversity: Experiencing trauma, abuse, neglect, bullying, violence, or parental loss during childhood may affect the development of the brain and increase the risk of psychosis and schizophrenia.

•  Birth season: Being born in late winter or early spring may increase the risk of schizophrenia due to factors such as infections. 

Vitamin D deficiency: Low vitamin D levels produced by exposure to sunlight may increase the risk of schizophrenia.

Brain Factors

Schizophrenia may be associated with changes in the structure and function of the brain. These changes may include:

•  Abnormalities in brain chemistry: The levels or activity of certain brain chemicals called neurotransmitters, such as dopamine and glutamate, may be altered in schizophrenia. These chemicals transmit messages between brain cells and affect various aspects of cognition and emotion.

•  Abnormalities in brain structure: People with schizophrenia may have differences in the size or shape of certain brain regions, such as the ventricles (fluid-filled spaces), the hippocampus (involved in memory), or the prefrontal cortex (involved in executive function). These differences may be present before the onset of symptoms or develop over time.

•  Abnormalities in brain connectivity: The connections or networks between different brain regions may be disrupted or impaired in schizophrenia. This may affect how different brain parts communicate and coordinate with each other.

Treatments for Schizophrenia

Schizophrenia is a lifelong condition that requires ongoing treatment and support. The main goals of treatment are to reduce the symptoms of psychosis, prevent relapses, improve functioning, and enhance the quality of life. Treatment for schizophrenia usually involves a combination of medication and psychosocial interventions.

Medication

Medication is the cornerstone of schizophrenia treatment, as it can help reduce or control the positive symptoms of psychosis. The most commonly used medications for schizophrenia are called antipsychotics. They work by affecting the brain’s chemical dopamine, which is thought to be involved in psychosis.

Types of Medication

There are two types of antipsychotics: first-generation and second-generation.

First-generation antipsychotics

First-generation antipsychotics are older drugs that have been used since the 1950s. They include chlorpromazine, haloperidol, fluphenazine, and perphenazine.

Second-generation antipsychotics

Second-generation antipsychotics are newer drugs that have been developed since the 1990s. They include risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, aripiprazole, ziprasidone, paliperidone, lurasidone, and clozapine.

Both types of antipsychotics can be effective in reducing positive symptoms, but they have different side effects. First-generation antipsychotics tend to cause more movement-related side effects, such as stiffness, tremors, restlessness, or tardive dyskinesia (involuntary movements of the face or limbs). Second-generation antipsychotics tend to cause more metabolic side effects, such as weight gain, diabetes, high cholesterol, or cardiovascular problems.

The choice of medication depends on several factors, such as the severity and type of symptoms, the response and tolerance to previous medications, the preference and willingness of the person with schizophrenia, and the availability and cost of the medication. The dosage and duration of medication may vary from person to person and may need to be adjusted over time. Some people may need to take more than one medication or switch medications if they do not respond well or experience intolerable side effects.

It is important to take medication as prescribed by the doctor and to monitor for any side effects or changes in symptoms. It is also important to consult the doctor before stopping or changing medication, as this may cause relapse or withdrawal symptoms. Medication should not be stopped abruptly without medical supervision.

Psychosocial Interventions

Psychosocial interventions are non-medical treatments that aim to help people with schizophrenia cope with their condition, improve their functioning, and enhance their quality of life. Psychosocial interventions can complement medication and address the negative and cognitive symptoms that medication may not fully resolve. Psychosocial interventions can also educate and support people with schizophrenia and their families.

Some examples of psychosocial interventions are:

•  Psychotherapy: Psychotherapy is a form of counseling that involves talking with a trained mental health professional about one’s thoughts, feelings, experiences, and challenges related to schizophrenia. Psychotherapy can help people with schizophrenia cope with their symptoms, improve their self-esteem, and enhance their social skills. There are different types of psychotherapy, such as cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), and supportive therapy.

•  Cognitive remediation: Cognitive remediation is training that aims to improve cognitive skills such as memory, attention, and problem-solving. Cognitive remediation can help people with schizophrenia overcome difficulties they face in daily functioning and achieve their personal goals.

•  Social skills training: Social skills training is an intervention that teaches people with schizophrenia how to interact effectively with others in various situations. Social skills training can help people with schizophrenia improve communication, assertiveness, and conflict-resolution skills.

•  Family education and support: Family education and support provide information and guidance to family members of people with schizophrenia. Family education and support can help families understand the nature and course of schizophrenia, cope with the disorder’s impact, and support their loved one’s recovery.

•  Vocational rehabilitation: Vocational rehabilitation is a service that helps people with schizophrenia find and keep meaningful employment or education. Vocational rehabilitation can help people with schizophrenia assess their strengths and interests, develop work skills, and access job opportunities.

•  Case management: Case management is a service that helps people with schizophrenia coordinate their care and access various resources. Case managers can help people with schizophrenia navigate the mental health system, arrange appointments, monitor medication adherence, and link them to other services such as housing, transportation, or legal aid.

Recovery from Schizophrenia

Recovery from schizophrenia is possible for many people who receive treatment and support. Recovery does not necessarily mean that all symptoms will disappear or that the person will return to their previous level of functioning. Rather, recovery means that the person can live a satisfying and meaningful life despite having schizophrenia.

Recovery from schizophrenia is a personal and ongoing process that involves

•  Having hope and optimism for the future

•  Having a sense of agency and control over one’s life

•  Having a positive sense of self and identity

•  Having meaningful roles and relationships

•  Having a sense of purpose and direction

•  Having access to opportunities and resources

Many factors influence recovery from schizophrenia

•  The severity and duration of symptoms

•  The availability and quality of treatment

•  The level of social support

•  The degree of stigma and discrimination

•  The presence of co-occurring conditions

•  The Personal coping strategies and resilience

Recovery from schizophrenia is not a linear or predictable process. It may involve periods of improvement and relapse, as well as challenges and setbacks. However, recovery from schizophrenia is also possible for many people who receive treatment and support. With appropriate care and assistance, people with schizophrenia can achieve their personal goals and live fulfilling lives.

Final Thoughts

Schizophrenia is a serious mental disorder that affects how a person thinks, feels, and behaves. People with schizophrenia may experience psychosis, which means they lose touch with reality and may have hallucinations, delusions, or disorganized thinking. Schizophrenia can interfere with daily living and cause significant disability and distress.

Genetic, environmental, and brain factors cause schizophrenia. There is no cure for schizophrenia, but it can be treated with medication and psychosocial interventions. Treatment can help reduce the symptoms of psychosis and improve the functioning and quality of life of people with schizophrenia and their families.

Recovery from schizophrenia is possible for many people who receive treatment and support. Recovery means that the person can live a satisfying

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